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Chris Pollock

Chris Pollock - web developer & ecommerce entrepreneur
undivided… my thoughts on world, family, church, business, technology and Jesus Christ (all in all)

You have how many children???

We by no means have a lot of children by historical standards, but according to our current culture standards the reactions we get are quite the opposite. One of my little jokes when people remark about how many children we have, I say that I'm just making up for all the people who are not having children. Well it turns out that my joke is really no joke at all. Here's a short video on a stable population.

  • Dave

    Part of the overpopulation argument stems from the classic simplified living question: "How much is enough?"

    Why do we constantly struggle for more? Would we be better with more — or maybe things would be fine with what we have today, or what existed in our parents generation.

    I went through the website that hosts the above video, and I couldn't find any arguments for why we should have a desire to increase our population. Its actually not a very concincing site, it seems mostly to just be preaching to the choir. There's not a lot there to convince someone that already thinks we should be shooting for a 1.6 birthrate that their aiming too low.

    What I would love to see is something like the following.

    Hypothesis: Today, there are exactly enough people in the world. Everyone should strive for 2.1 children to maintain the constant birthrate.

    Now — argue that people should strive for more, or less, than the stabilization rate.

    On the side for increasing, I typically hear things like:
    1. Our current economic model is based on an ever increasing population, so we better keep it up or things will be different in the future.

    2. (From the nations with low birthrates) If we want to maintain our cultural/religious identity, we better have more children to help balance world demographics. There are too many people from XXX or, people that believe YYY already.

    3. My religion tells me to have lots of children (or, at least, to not prevent a woman from having a child).

    On the other side of the coin, I see things like:
    1) The capacity to support a healthy population is very low in some parts of the world; the same parts of the world where population is very high.

    2) Longer life expectancy will mean we need a lower birth rate to reach replacement. Either this means having kids much later (compare at 30 to at 20 — you have a 1/3 reduction in people after 60 years), or having fewer children to maintain a stable population in the long term.

    3) Instead of birth rates, use immigration or adoption as a means to maintain population and economic norms in 1st world nations, and improve conditions in third world nations.

    4) I'm happy with the resources awarded to me today, and given the choice between sharing a finite number of resources amongst more ore less people, I'll choose less. that's more for me. (Which usually then leads to… "And so you should have less babies so they don't take my stuff. Me? No, that doesn't apply to me, remember, I always want more…")

    So, my arguments are not particularly good, but I would love to hear them argued more articulately on both sides of the coin. From everyone I've ever talked to about population controls, the MoreBabies camp seems to be arguing mostly on emotions, feelings and a desire to resist change. Where the LessBabies seems to be arguing exclusively economics (often theoretical) without considering the social implications of their suggestions.

    I don't suppose you have any other resources worth sharing on this topic? It would be interesting to read more. I formed my opinion about 15 years ago, and obviously things are different now, both for me and the rest of the world.

  • Dave

    And wow, after leaving that giant comment of doom, I looked at your picture section and realized: This isn't that guy I used to work with… this is a total stranger.

    Ah well, the best ideas I've ever heard come from people I've never met. I hope you don't mind the discussion. I'd still love to hear your thoughts on this.

  • http://web.simplifiedbuilding.com cwpollock

    Dave,

    I agree that the author of the video sees a stable population as some sort of goal or necessity. I'm not sure why he says that. I'm not sure of all his presuppositions that lead him to believe that stable = good. I'm sure there's a lot to debated in that arena.

    I think for me personally this series of videos caught my interest because there have been those that look at our family as somehow being irresponsible by choosing to have many children. I think what this series does is at least tries to debunk the idea that having a lot of kids is somehow socially or economically irresponsible.

    Another thing that the author is aiming at is helping people think correctly about population so that we don't descend into the same kind of population control tactics (such as forced abortions) like you see in China.

    As far as resources, the only thing I've looked into is the people who produced the video and you can find their information at http://pop.org.

    I'm not sure I've answered your questions or entered your debate, but hopefully you understand what was behind my thinking in posting the video.

  • Mike Holbein

    Chris, Did Keith inform you he built a rock climbing room in our basement. Still there. Perhaps when (Lord willing) the future grandchildren come to visit there will be a place for them to excercise in the winer time.

  • http://vitadonna.com/blogs/user/Rhysawapqr Emma

    Hi there, for all time i used to check webpage posts here early in the break of day, for the reason that i like to gain knowledge of more and more.

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Quote form @amylpollock "Children are always the most creative when they are supposed to be doing something else". #quotes #artforkids #quotesaboutkidsTheir own version of Tower BridgeIt's 8:30am. Kids already in the pool!ProviderYes. It's true. I turned 40 on Wednesday.Sand funToday is our 17th anniversary! Love dancing in the minefields with this woman.Every baby loves bath time!! Big enough for 3 (or 4). #bathtime #lifewithboys #bathtimeinsanityMagazine ad for children's body lotion. Radox??!!??:scream::joy:. #britishbrandingLook what I can do.There's something about this product name that just makes me want to laugh out loud. Guess I can't buy it... since I'm not diabetic:joy: #diabeticvanilla #britishbrandingFor discipline one of my kids was to do some copying. I asked him to bring me a piece of paper and pencil with a clipboard. This was what I got... funny guy!! #lifewithboysBoys playing with Simon's bday present.Captivated audience as Simon opens his presents. #9thbirthdayMaking a mast together. #teamwork #chathamhistoricdockyards #brothers

Chris Pollock

Web Developer - proficient in both PHP and ASP.NET.
Rochester, New York

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Quote form @amylpollock "Children are always the most creative when they are supposed to be doing something else". #quotes #artforkids #quotesaboutkidsTheir own version of Tower BridgeIt's 8:30am. Kids already in the pool!ProviderYes. It's true. I turned 40 on Wednesday.Sand funToday is our 17th anniversary! Love dancing in the minefields with this woman.Every baby loves bath time!! Big enough for 3 (or 4). #bathtime #lifewithboys #bathtimeinsanityMagazine ad for children's body lotion. Radox??!!??:scream::joy:. #britishbrandingLook what I can do.There's something about this product name that just makes me want to laugh out loud. Guess I can't buy it... since I'm not diabetic:joy: #diabeticvanilla #britishbrandingFor discipline one of my kids was to do some copying. I asked him to bring me a piece of paper and pencil with a clipboard. This was what I got... funny guy!! #lifewithboysBoys playing with Simon's bday present.Captivated audience as Simon opens his presents. #9thbirthdayMaking a mast together. #teamwork #chathamhistoricdockyards #brothers